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Tuesday, January 22, 2019 - 10:27am

Hi supporters!

This is Harvey the Great Horned Owl. Harvey was admitted to the clinic in 2011 after being hit by a car, resulting in a left eye injury to severe to fix. His eye was removed by our veterinarians and Harvey has been an educational ambassador ever since. Harvey loves to spend time in our outdoor flight enclosures every day as he is still fully flighted! He acts as a great adult figure and teacher to orphaned juvenile Great Horned Owls we admit. 
Care for Harvey and all of our other ambassadors and patients can be very expensive. You can help us by sponsoring Harvey! When you sponsor a ambassador you will receive a certificate, a picture of your sponsored ambassador, as well as a tour of the WCC facility.

To learn more about sponsoring Harvey or any of our other ambassadors or patients, go to our website: https://www.nrem.iastate.edu/wildlife-care-clinic/ and click on the donate tab.

Hi supporters! This is Harvey the Great Horned Owl. Harvey was admitted to the clinic in 2011 after being hit by a car, resulting in a left eye injury to severe to fix. His eye was removed by our veterinarians and Harvey has been an educational ambassador ever since. Harvey loves to spend time in our outdoor flight enclosures every day as he is still fully flighted! He acts as a great adult figure and teacher to orphaned juvenile Great Horned Owls we admit. Care for Harvey and all of our other ambassadors and patients can be very expensive. You can help us by sponsoring Harvey! When you sponsor a ambassador you will receive a certificate, a picture of your sponsored ambassador, as well as a tour of the WCC facility. To learn more about sponsoring Harvey or any of our other ambassadors or patients, go to our website: https://www.nrem.iastate.edu/wildlife-care-clinic/ and click on the donate tab.
Thursday, January 17, 2019 - 3:22pm

Patient of the week: 
This Red-tailed hawk came to us last weekend with swelling and bruising from mid radius-ulna to mid humerus on the right wing. Radiographs confirmed a non-displaced ulna fracture. We are keeping the wing in place with a wrap, and are giving medication to help reduce the swelling and manage any pain. 
If you want to help the rehabilitation of this hawk you can sponsor her! It costs $75 to sponsor this hawk. The money will be used to cover food and medical treatment that is needed for her rehabilitation. 
When you sponsor a patient, you will receive current updates on the patient and will get the opportunity to attend the animal's release. You can sponsor this hawk by following this link! https://www.nrem.iastate.edu/wildlife-care-clinic/red-tailed-hawk

Patient of the week: This Red-tailed hawk came to us last weekend with swelling and bruising from mid radius-ulna to mid humerus on the right wing. Radiographs confirmed a non-displaced ulna fracture. We are keeping the wing in place with a wrap, and are giving medication to help reduce the swelling and manage any pain. If you want to help the rehabilitation of this hawk you can sponsor her! It costs $75 to sponsor this hawk. The money will be used to cover food and medical treatment that is needed for her rehabilitation. When you sponsor a patient, you will receive current updates on the patient and will get the opportunity to attend the animal's release. You can sponsor this hawk by following this link! https://www.nrem.iastate.edu/wildlife-care-clinic/red-tailed-hawk
Wednesday, January 9, 2019 - 2:35pm

Hi supporters! 
This is Screechy the Eastern Screech Owl. Screechy may be small but he has a big attitude. He loves taking baths, hanging out on his cat complex and perches, and eating mealworms!

Screechy was admitted to the clinic in 2000 after being hit by a car, resulting in fractures to both wings and partial blindness in both eyes. These injuries left him non-releasable and he is now our oldest Educational Ambassador. Screechy has become an ambassador through educational efforts by attending programs, acting as model for Iowa Wildlife, and helping inform the public of our facility and how they can help.

One way you can help is by sponsoring Screechy! Care for Screechy and all of our other ambassadors and patients we get in can be very expensive. If you choose to sponsor Screechy, you will receive a certificate, a picture of your sponsored ambassador, as well as a tour of the WCC facility. 
To learn more about sponsoring Screechy or any of our other ambassadors or patients, go to our website:  https://www.nrem.iastate.edu/wildlife-care-clinic/ and click on the donate tab.

Hi supporters! This is Screechy the Eastern Screech Owl. Screechy may be small but he has a big attitude. He loves taking baths, hanging out on his cat complex and perches, and eating mealworms! Screechy was admitted to the clinic in 2000 after being hit by a car, resulting in fractures to both wings and partial blindness in both eyes. These injuries left him non-releasable and he is now our oldest Educational Ambassador. Screechy has become an ambassador through educational efforts by attending programs, acting as model for Iowa Wildlife, and helping inform the public of our facility and how they can help. One way you can help is by sponsoring Screechy! Care for Screechy and all of our other ambassadors and patients we get in can be very expensive. If you choose to sponsor Screechy, you will receive a certificate, a picture of your sponsored ambassador, as well as a tour of the WCC facility. To learn more about sponsoring Screechy or any of our other ambassadors or patients, go to our website: https://www.nrem.iastate.edu/wildlife-care-clinic/ and click on the donate tab.
Saturday, January 5, 2019 - 4:59pm

Hi supporters! 
We want to thank everyone for the donations over the holidays. We greatly appreciate your continued help and support. 
Attached are pictures of our permanent residents, Screechy, Tryx, and Harvey with some enrichment gift boxes. Enrichment is an important part of wildlife rehabilitation that helps keep our patients and permanents both mentally and physically active. 
We wish you all a Happy New Year!

Hi supporters! We want to thank everyone for the donations over the holidays. We greatly appreciate your continued help and support. Attached are pictures of our permanent residents, Screechy, Tryx, and Harvey with some enrichment gift boxes. Enrichment is an important part of wildlife rehabilitation that helps keep our patients and permanents both mentally and physically active. We wish you all a Happy New Year!
Sunday, December 23, 2018 - 2:53pm

The Three-toed box turtle is named for usually having three toes on their hind limbs. They also have a hinged shell- this shell makes it particularly hard to treat them due to their ability to completely conceal their legs and head into their shell. They are often mistaken for a tortoise since they live in a predominantly terrestrial habitat, but they are actually considered a pond turtle! 
This Three-toed box turtle was brought to us a couple months ago because someone had picked him up from a state over while on vacation with the intention of keeping him as a pet, but surrendered him when he was no longer wanted. 
Wild turtles do not make for good pets because they require very large spaces with access to water and they migrate seasonally to stay in the proper humidity. They are not familiar with life in captivity so they may never adjust. Turtles have small home territories and should be left where found.

This box turtle was released back to his home territory soon after admitted by one of our staff members.

The Three-toed box turtle is named for usually having three toes on their hind limbs. They also have a hinged shell- this shell makes it particularly hard to treat them due to their ability to completely conceal their legs and head into their shell. They are often mistaken for a tortoise since they live in a predominantly terrestrial habitat, but they are actually considered a pond turtle! This Three-toed box turtle was brought to us a couple months ago because someone had picked him up from a state over while on vacation with the intention of keeping him as a pet, but surrendered him when he was no longer wanted. Wild turtles do not make for good pets because they require very large spaces with access to water and they migrate seasonally to stay in the proper humidity. They are not familiar with life in captivity so they may never adjust. Turtles have small home territories and should be left where found. This box turtle was released back to his home territory soon after admitted by one of our staff members.

Hours

Monday 8AM-6PM
Tuesday 8AM-6PM
Wednesday 8AM-6PM
Thursday 8AM-6PM
Friday 8AM-6PM
Saturday 8AM-6PM
Sunday 8AM-6PM
*On call 24/7