Instagram

Saturday, July 21, 2018 - 4:41pm

This weeks Patient of the Week post is dedicated to our young Trumpeter Swan, or cygnet. 
Trumpeter Swans are the largest waterfowl species native to North America. Most Trumpeters weigh 21-30 pounds, although large males may exceed 35 pounds. With a wingspan over 7 feet, these snow-white birds are truly spectacular! 
If you would like to support this Trumpeter Swans rehabilitation through a donation, please email wcc@iastate.edu.

This weeks Patient of the Week post is dedicated to our young Trumpeter Swan, or cygnet. Trumpeter Swans are the largest waterfowl species native to North America. Most Trumpeters weigh 21-30 pounds, although large males may exceed 35 pounds. With a wingspan over 7 feet, these snow-white birds are truly spectacular! If you would like to support this Trumpeter Swans rehabilitation through a donation, please email wcc@iastate.edu.
Friday, July 20, 2018 - 4:31pm

Hi everyone,

ONLY 5 DAYS LEFT TO BUY YOUR WCC APPAREL! 
We are only $200 away from reaching our fundraising goal. By purchasing clothing items from our campaign, you are helping us raise money for food, medical care, and all others things our wild patients are in need of.

Here is the link: https://inktothepeople.com/wear-it-for-wildlife-iv

Hi everyone, ONLY 5 DAYS LEFT TO BUY YOUR WCC APPAREL! We are only $200 away from reaching our fundraising goal. By purchasing clothing items from our campaign, you are helping us raise money for food, medical care, and all others things our wild patients are in need of. Here is the link: https://inktothepeople.com/wear-it-for-wildlife-iv
Thursday, July 12, 2018 - 7:48pm

It's time to meet our Patient of the Week: an adult Virginia Opossum! 
He came to the Wildlife Care Clinic with a tail degloving, an injury where the skin is pulled away from the underlying tissue and in this case, exposed the bone. After undergoing a minor tail amputation in May to correct this injury, he has been recovering here at the WCC and release is in sight. 
YOU can help support this Virginia Opossum's rehabilitation through a donation. Check out his page on our website to find out how. Here's the link: https://www.nrem.iastate.edu/wildlife-care-clinic/virginia-opossum 
Thank you all for the support!

It's time to meet our Patient of the Week: an adult Virginia Opossum! He came to the Wildlife Care Clinic with a tail degloving, an injury where the skin is pulled away from the underlying tissue and in this case, exposed the bone. After undergoing a minor tail amputation in May to correct this injury, he has been recovering here at the WCC and release is in sight. YOU can help support this Virginia Opossum's rehabilitation through a donation. Check out his page on our website to find out how. Here's the link: https://www.nrem.iastate.edu/wildlife-care-clinic/virginia-opossum Thank you all for the support!
Thursday, July 12, 2018 - 7:33pm

Our juvenile Virginia Opossum is here to brighten your day. Happy Thursday!

Our juvenile Virginia Opossum is here to brighten your day. Happy Thursday!
Thursday, July 5, 2018 - 10:19pm

This weeks Patient of the Week post is dedicated to our juvenile Snapping Turtle that was admitted to the WCC one week ago after being found in the road with injuries. Upon admittance, we found a few minor fractures of the carapace that we cleaned up and are allowing to heal via second intention (on their own). As you can see in the video, he is a great eater and is doing well in our care. The fractures are healing beautifully so we are already planning release! 
Remember if you see a turtle trying to cross a road, its okay to help it get across simply by picking it up and taking it to the other side in the direction it was heading. But keep in mind that they are very attached to their home territories and will travel far to get back to them, so do not try to relocate them. Of course if you find an injured turtle, give us a call and we will give you the information you need.

This weeks Patient of the Week post is dedicated to our juvenile Snapping Turtle that was admitted to the WCC one week ago after being found in the road with injuries. Upon admittance, we found a few minor fractures of the carapace that we cleaned up and are allowing to heal via second intention (on their own). As you can see in the video, he is a great eater and is doing well in our care. The fractures are healing beautifully so we are already planning release! Remember if you see a turtle trying to cross a road, its okay to help it get across simply by picking it up and taking it to the other side in the direction it was heading. But keep in mind that they are very attached to their home territories and will travel far to get back to them, so do not try to relocate them. Of course if you find an injured turtle, give us a call and we will give you the information you need.

Hours

Monday 8AM-8PM
Tuesday 8AM-8PM
Wednesday 8AM-8PM
Thursday 8AM-8PM
Friday 8AM-8PM
Saturday 8AM-8PM
Sunday 8AM-8PM
*On call 24/7