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Friday, May 18, 2018 - 1:33am

Meet our nestling crow patient! He was admitted about one week ago, apparently healthy. He has now begun flapping his wings and is moving into the fledgling stage of his life.

Meet our nestling crow patient! He was admitted about one week ago, apparently healthy. He has now begun flapping his wings and is moving into the fledgling stage of his life.
Saturday, May 12, 2018 - 10:14pm

We admitted two nestling Great Horned Owls two weeks ago. They are apparently healthy, just orphans. We administered fluids on admission and have been feeding them, and they have been thriving! Today was their first day in our outdoor enclosure with our Great Horned Owl permanent resident, Harvey. The nestlings and Harvey have been getting along great. Throughout their stay with us, Harvey will be able to teach them useful owl skills before they are eventually released! 
If you ever find a juvenile raptor, it's important to be able to identify whether the bird is a nestling or fledgling. If the juvenile is mainly covered in downy feathers, then it is a nestling. If the juvenile is on the ground, hopping, and has feathers (and maybe some retained downy feathers), then it is a fledgling. If you find a juvenile raptor and aren't sure what to do, give the WCC a call and we can help you explore options of renesting the bird, leaving the bird alone, or possible rehabilitation. 
We hope everyone is having a wonderful summer! We have been busy, but we're having a fun busy season so far.

We admitted two nestling Great Horned Owls two weeks ago. They are apparently healthy, just orphans. We administered fluids on admission and have been feeding them, and they have been thriving! Today was their first day in our outdoor enclosure with our Great Horned Owl permanent resident, Harvey. The nestlings and Harvey have been getting along great. Throughout their stay with us, Harvey will be able to teach them useful owl skills before they are eventually released! If you ever find a juvenile raptor, it's important to be able to identify whether the bird is a nestling or fledgling. If the juvenile is mainly covered in downy feathers, then it is a nestling. If the juvenile is on the ground, hopping, and has feathers (and maybe some retained downy feathers), then it is a fledgling. If you find a juvenile raptor and aren't sure what to do, give the WCC a call and we can help you explore options of renesting the bird, leaving the bird alone, or possible rehabilitation. We hope everyone is having a wonderful summer! We have been busy, but we're having a fun busy season so far.
Thursday, May 10, 2018 - 10:55am

The WCC successfully released our first orphan of baby season - a Rock Pigeon! 
During the pigeons stay with us, he wasnt eating on his own, so we had to bring in another pigeon from a different center to teach him how to eat. It worked perfectly, and they were released together.

The WCC successfully released our first orphan of baby season - a Rock Pigeon! During the pigeons stay with us, he wasnt eating on his own, so we had to bring in another pigeon from a different center to teach him how to eat. It worked perfectly, and they were released together.
Thursday, April 19, 2018 - 11:00pm

Hi everyone, 
Sorry we haven't posted for awhile. We have been very busy with the start of baby season! 
The WCC staff would like to thank everyone that has donated to us recently. Our last donation drive was very successful and we've been getting a lot of great items sent to us from our Amazon Wishlist! We also reached our donation goal for a new incubator!! We truly appreciate all of your help. The WCC wouldn't be able to do what we do without the help of our supporters. 
Enjoy these photos of some of our newly admitted patients. They are all healthy orphans.

Hi everyone, Sorry we haven't posted for awhile. We have been very busy with the start of baby season! The WCC staff would like to thank everyone that has donated to us recently. Our last donation drive was very successful and we've been getting a lot of great items sent to us from our Amazon Wishlist! We also reached our donation goal for a new incubator!! We truly appreciate all of your help. The WCC wouldn't be able to do what we do without the help of our supporters. Enjoy these photos of some of our newly admitted patients. They are all healthy orphans.
Wednesday, March 7, 2018 - 5:37pm

The Wildlife Care Clinic is happy to share our latest release story with you!
This Mute Swan was separated from its partner and admitted to us a few weeks ago due to having a sublingual impaction. A sublingual impaction is a pouch that forms underneath the tongue which food then accumulates in, making it difficult to eat and drink. We removed the food from the pouch and gave it time to return to normal size, along with a few other treatments. 
After our patient was returned to full health, these two love birds were finally reunited. As you can see, they were very happy to see each other!

The Wildlife Care Clinic is happy to share our latest release story with you! This Mute Swan was separated from its partner and admitted to us a few weeks ago due to having a sublingual impaction. A sublingual impaction is a pouch that forms underneath the tongue which food then accumulates in, making it difficult to eat and drink. We removed the food from the pouch and gave it time to return to normal size, along with a few other treatments. After our patient was returned to full health, these two love birds were finally reunited. As you can see, they were very happy to see each other!

Hours

Monday 8AM-8PM
Tuesday 8AM-8PM
Wednesday 8AM-8PM
Thursday 8AM-8PM
Friday 8AM-8PM
Saturday 8AM-8PM
Sunday 8AM-8PM
*On call 24/7