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Darwin Pierce - Farm Manager

Darwin Pierce is the Farm Manager at Whiterock Conservancy, 5,500 acre non-profit land trust near Coon Rapids, Iowa. Whiterock's mission is to balance sustainable agriculture, natural resource protection, and public recreation. Mr. Pierce was interviewed by Rob Davis, Whiterock's Conservation Land Manager, in March, 2018 about why he pursued prairie strips as a practice for one of the row-crop fields at the Conservancy. 

Rob: How were you first introduced to prairie strips?

Paul Mugge - Farmer

Paul Mugge farms 300 acres of organic corn, soybeans, small grains, and alfalfa in O’Brien County, Iowa. He has been all farming since 1976 and all organic since 2002. He’s a prairie strips pioneer, having established his first prairie strip in 2002. He shared his story with J. Arbuckle from the STRIPS team on July 16, 2018.

J.: What were your goals in establishing prairie strips?

Maggie McQuown - Landowner

Maggie McQuown and her husband Steve Turman live on the farm Maggie grew up on outside of Red Oak, Iowa. Her 170-acre “Resilient Farms” includes a market garden, 130 acres of corn and soybeans, and a variety of conservation features including a riparian buffer and prairie strips. She chatted with J. Arbuckle from the STRIPS team on July 16, 2018 about why she sees prairie strips as a good option for her cropland.

J.: How were you first introduced to prairie strips?

David Gossman - Landowner

David Gossman owns 670 acres in Jackson County, Iowa, 220 of which he share crops with his farmer. They farm corn and soybeans using conventional methods. He is a prairie reconstruction pioneer, establishing many patches of prairie on his farm starting in 1996. He met with Tim Youngquist from the STRIPS team on September 29, 2018 to discuss his motivations and methods for establishing prairie strips.

Tim: How were you first introduced to prairie strips?

Frequently Asked Questions

Prairie strips at NSNWR by Meghann JarchowPrairie strips is a farmland conservation practice that uses strategically placed native prairie plantings in crop fields. The practice has been tested by the STRIPS team since 2007 on experimental plots at the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge and increasingly on commercial farms across Iowa. Here we present our responses to the Frequently Asked Questions we receive on prairie strips at conferences and field days, and through email. The information was prepared by team members, and will be updated over time as needed, as we continue to learn. The answers below are general in nature, and may not apply in specific situations. Resources are provided with each answer. Read more about Frequently Asked Questions

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