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Estimated Sediment Deposition and Movement within Interim 1 Watershed at the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge: A Summary of E.A. Luquin Oroz, 2016

Strategically placing a small percentage of prairie strips within agriculture fields has been shown to reduce field level soil loss. However, less is known about in-field soil movement both erosion and deposition. Also, with the potential for increasingly stronger rainstorms and hence higher runoff, there is a need to obtain new insights about prairie strips design and its influence on sediment dynamics. Read more about Estimated Sediment Deposition and Movement within Interim 1 Watershed at the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge: A Summary of E.A. Luquin Oroz, 2016

Maggie McQuown - Landowner

Maggie McQuown and her husband Steve Turman live on the farm Maggie grew up on outside of Red Oak, Iowa. Her 170-acre “Resilient Farms” includes a market garden, 130 acres of corn and soybeans, and a variety of conservation features including a riparian buffer and prairie strips. She chatted with J. Arbuckle from the STRIPS team on July 16, 2018 about why she sees prairie strips as a good option for her cropland.

J.: How were you first introduced to prairie strips?

David Gossman - Landowner

David Gossman owns 670 acres in Jackson County, Iowa, 220 of which he share crops with his farmer. They farm corn and soybeans using conventional methods. He is a prairie reconstruction pioneer, establishing many patches of prairie on his farm starting in 1996. He met with Tim Youngquist from the STRIPS team on September 29, 2018 to discuss his motivations and methods for establishing prairie strips.

Tim: How were you first introduced to prairie strips?

Rick Cruse

Rick Cruse
Lead Contacts
Investigators
Professor
Director of the Iowa Water Center
STRIPS Soil Health Research Lead
Area of Expertise: 
Soil Science